Capt. Gregory C. Daley

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Sea Stories
M/V Chaos In Canada

I managed and was captain of Chaos, a Fairline 66 yacht, for a year. We experienced so many adventures on Chaos. I delivered her from Michigan to Wisconsin and oversaw her decommissioning for travel by truck. I followed the truck from Wisconsin to Clarksville, WA and over saw her re-commissioning. I brought her down the eight locks of the Snake and Columbia Rivers to Portland, Oregon. Then it was up to Vancouver and Victoria, Canada for several months. We made a long passage down the west coast to Marina del Rey for refurbishing. We escorted the Marina del Rey to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico sailboat race. We spent a few months in Puerto Vallarta making voyages as far south as Manzanillo. We spent a month in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico during Spring Break. We made a long passage back up the west coast to Santa Barbara, California.

This page is about the adventures of Chaos in Canada. We based in Vancouver, BC. Made several trips to Desolation Sound, Princess Louisa Inlet, the Gulf Islands and spent several nights in Victoria during our voyage back to the United States.

The pictures on this page are cropped from a full size picture which gives a better perspective to what is being shown. To see a picture full size, simply click on the picture and it will appear full size in a new browser.


Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left is Chaos in Desolation Sound. The beauty of the boat against the Canadian mountains and the unique anchorages of Canada is breathtaking.

Our adventure started in Vancouver, British Columbia, which is in itself a destination. This town offers something for everyone. We were there during the summer and the weather was perfect.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. This bridge connects Vancouver with North Vancouver. It is the gateway from Prince Edwards Sound to the city.

Our mooring was way out at the end of a very long dock, designed for the big boats. A really big boat was on the other side of the dock for a few weeks. Otherwise, we had a spectacular view of the harbor and city.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. These views from a nearby apartment give you a sense of the size of the city marina. You can see our location in the close up.



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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Another shot of us at our mooring without the big boat.

I can truly say that Chaos was the most enjoyable experience of my boating career. I never knew what was in store next. But it was always different, unexpected, and world class.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. This area complete with waterfalls and tucked away houses is less than an hour away from the city harbor in totally protected waters. The beauty of the area is unmatched.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. The main river separating Vancouver from the airport is navigable. This area served as the site of one of the World Fares.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. These are some of the World Fare buildings we saw on our tour of the river.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Some of the buildings are quite spectacular.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. The children of the owner enjoyed tubing. Of course tubing behind a 66 foot yacht at 31 knots redefines the concept of tubing. Falling off the tube, priceless.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Princess Louisa Inlet is guarded by the Malibu Rapids. Yes, our 66 foot "shot" the rapids to enter the inlet. You have to go at slack tide with no current running. The current makes the rapids impassible in our size vessel.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Once inside the inlet, you travel up a few miles to the very end, which is Chatterbox falls. This anchorage is so quiet and quaint; you wouldn't ever consider running the generator here.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Chatterbox Falls in the summer runs at minimum volume. In the Spring it makes quite a chatter. You can hike up to the falls easily. It is quite a destination far from the beaten path.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Departing the falls you can see how majestic the Inlet is. The feeling of total relaxation is overwhelming (if you aren't the Captain running the rapids).

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the outbound trip, the rapids were just starting to kick up. We were only one half hour off slack tide and we were able to pass safely at this time.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Next stop was Desolation Sound. Yes, this is the entrance to our anchorage. Again, not much leeway for error with such a narrow passage. You certainly wouldn't want to enter at low tide.

Once inside, there is a feeling of unbelievable exhilaration. You feel overwhelmed by being in such a beautiful place without any other boats around.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. We were in a big hurry to return to Chaos in the dinghy because we saw a sign saying that the oysters were poisonous and we had seen the kids harvest several dozen. Yes we arrived before any were consumed.

Underway again and tired from a busy day. We travelled many miles that day thanks to our 31 knot speed.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. This was the cutest little sea coast town. We arrived late in the afternoon making the unknown waters full of boulders somewhat treacherous. Not a lot of aids to navigation around here.

One of the most quaint fuel docks we used. Really nice proprietor, though she was scared to death of boats. We could not convince her to come aboard.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Most of the travel in this area was in mountain lined gorges such as this. The area reminded me a lot of Stavanger, Norway. About the same latitude as well.

As a child I had a 33 RPM vinyl record about logging in the Northwest. Finally I am watching an actual raft of logs being towed. A huge amount of logs towed by one tug. It is easy to see why there are so many dead heads running around loose in the area.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Everyone on board always had a good time. Here we are going through a narrow pass in the Gulf Islands. We had a terrible passage from Vancouver to Vancouver Island and everyone was glad to see calm water again.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. A good friend of the owner and his wife clowning around on Chaos. Canadians seem fascinated by the Stars and Stripes!

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Another quaint little town in the Gulf Islands. Someone made some beautiful paintings on plain old rubber boots. They were really cute. Wish I'd thought of that.

The guests of Chaos always seemed to make their own magic. Here we sit at this small outside restaurant enjoying a glass of wine after dinner around an open pit fire. Someone suggest roasting marshmallows. Why not! We found bamboo plants we "harvested" and bought marshmallows at a local store and voila.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. The totally amazed and baffled waitress watches us roast our marshmallows. "No one has ever done that before." We actually attracted others who joined our party. Great way to make friends. Try it sometime!

As I said, guests always had a great time on Chaos. I can't remember why these guests are wearing my shirts. Something about silk shirt night.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. One guest claimed to be a horny devil and dressed appropriately.

There were so many waterfalls of all sizes and shapes.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the way up to Whistler I saw a really impressive waterfall and a very old tree with gnarled roots. What was impressive, yet scary, was how everything was bear proofed. Made me wish I was bear proof too.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. One weekend I made my way up to Whistler. No boating, but it is beautiful mountain location and quite the destination both in summer and winter. I was there between seasons and enjoyed the serenity.

Nice mountain stream in Whistler.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Here is one of the nicer hotels in the Whistler area. If I remember the name, I'll add it later.

Now this gal was quite a character. Tough as nails with a thick Canadian accent. Always a positive attitude and was strong as a horse. She reminded me of what I think the gals that hung around the docks in the sailing days of old must have been like. She was really great!

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. All good things must come to an end. We are starting the LONG trek to Los Angeles. But first we stopped in Victoria. Here we are entering the protected waters of the Gulf Islands from the North through a very narrow passage.

It was even funnier when we saw it. Why is this floating house being towed in open waters? Brave souls. No idea if they made it or not.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. Victoria is another great destination. Older and more charming than Vancouver, it offers more of a sea faring town flavor. The old hotel is famous and was lit up at night.

Here is our mooring area. In the blow up (click on the picture) you can see Chaos on the left. Behind the "marina" is the main entrance to the inner city harbor. If you look closely, you'll see that it is the main runway for a bevy of seaplanes going to a variety of destinations. Planes and boats must share the water serving as a runway.

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. The Union Club is a very famous old club in Canada. We were able to visit the club as guests of the people below. It was quite impressive.

I really wanted to take a picture of a bear eating a salmon from a dinghy. This was as close as I got - a stuffed bear on the street

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Click on picture to see an enlargement. I met the President of the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary at our US Coast Guard Auxiliary District Conference in California earlier that year. We were able to connect in Victoria. He gave us quite a tour of the area. They are much more active in Search and Rescue than their American counterparts.

At the time I was Division Captain of the Marina del Rey Division. On the right was the equivalent ranking officer in the Victoria area.

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Captain Gregory C. Daley
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