Capt. Gregory C. Daley

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Sea Stories
Military Sealift Command
People

As I went through my pictures of my MSC days, I realized there were too many fond memories to share on only one page. You'll find three MSC topics in the list to the left, one for training, one for people, and one for life at sea.

Military Sealift Command is a quasi military organization. The ships are owned by the US Navy and designed to replenish stores, weapons, diesel, jet fuel, etc to regular Navy ships while underway. However the ships are crewed with civilians - Civilians from all walks of life.

I served on board the John Lenthal, TAO-189, a tanker, as an Able Bodied Seaman (AB). I was a watchstander and one of three lead UNREP helmsmen. UNREP stands for Underway replenishment. The ships being replenished are from 100 to 200 feet to either side of the replenishing ship, very close considering we were an 800 foot tanker. The UNREP helmsman must hold course to plus or minus one half of a degree in 12 foot seas. It's far too dangerous to use an autopilot. Try it next time you go out on a boat. If you ever varied more than two degrees, you were relieved of duty.

The pictures on this page are cropped from a full size picture which gives a better perspective to what is being shown. To see a picture full size, simply click on the picture and it will appear full size in a new browser.


Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left is the Captain of the John Lenthal during my service. I deeply admire this Captain. He taught me so much about earning respect from your crew. He is a leader by example, not by words only.

On the right is the second mate.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. The character on the left is indeed a character. He is from Texas and has a lot of oilfield workboat experience.

On the right is a third mate from New Orleans. He is a Kings Point graduate. If you are thinking of becoming a ship's officer this is the most reliable and respected way to do it.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. There is a unique set of positions on these ships called cargo mates. On the left is our cargo mate. He always called me by the wrong name and I always called him by the wrong name.

On the right is a dear friend whom I have lost contact with.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left is one of the other two lead UNREP helmsmen.

On the right is the other lead UNREP helmsman. Both of these fellows were homesteaders. They rarely left the ship choosing to stay aboard for long periods of time. Consequently they knew a lot about the ship and developed their own ways of getting things done.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left is a good friend who has to climb through the ranks of OS and AB before he is able to go on to third mate. He is dedicated to his goal and I'm sure he will make it. He helmed as an OS in his time off.

On the right is another friend who took my position as a lead UNREP helmsman. He is on the verge of being able to test as third mate and should make it soon.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left is a very likeable fellow from Puerto Rico. He started every watch saying "I love this job." After a while, we believed him.

On the right is an Ordinary Seaman (OS) watchstander who I would characterize as cautious.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left is one of the best pastry chefs I've met. I put on extra pounds because of his baking, but it was worth it.

On the right is one of the lead cooks, a very kind person.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. Here are two of the many Phillipine seamen on board. These two were both in the steward department. They were very happy people.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

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Captain Gregory C. Daley
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