Capt. Gregory C. Daley

OCEANS
MASTER
EXPERT
WITNESS
PHOTO
GALLERY
COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHER
DELIVERY
CAPTAIN
SEA
STORIES
SEA
VIDEOS
REFERENCE
INFORMATION
<< Home

Life At Sea


  Qualifications

  Contact

























































































Sea Stories
Military Sealift Command
MSC Tanker
TAO-189 John Lenthal

As I went through my pictures of my MSC days, I realized there were too many fond memories to share on only one page. You'll find three MSC topics in the list to the left, one for training, one for people, and one for life at sea.

Military Sealift Command is a quasi military organization. The ships are owned by the US Navy and designed to replenish stores, weapons, diesel, jet fuel, etc to regular Navy ships while underway. However the ships are crewed with civilians - Civilians from all walks of life.

I served on board the John Lenthal, TAO-189, a tanker, as an Able Bodied Seaman (AB). I was a watchstander and one of three lead UNREP helmsmen. UNREP stands for Underway replenishment. The ships being replenished are from 100 to 200 feet to either side of the replenishing ship, very close considering we were an 800 foot tanker. The UNREP helmsman must hold course to plus or minus one half of a degree in 12 foot seas. It's far too dangerous to use an autopilot. Try it next time you go out on a boat. If you ever varied more than two degrees, you were relieved of duty.

The pictures on this page are cropped from a full size picture which gives a better perspective to what is being shown. To see a picture full size, simply click on the picture and it will appear full size in a new browser.


Click on picture to see an enlargement. Here you see the John Lenthal sandwiched between a destroyer and an aircraft carrier. It's easy to see why the tight steering tolerances are so important.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left you see an aircraft carrier coming up alongside the Lenthal. This can be done in quite a large sea state.

On the right you see the carrier alongside.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left you see the bridge.

On the right you see the starboard wing bridge

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. At the left you see me at my work station on the helm on the bridge. It is huge, the largest I've ever seen.

On the right you see the aft steering station. In critical situations the aft steering station was always manned in case the bridge lost control.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. The aft steering station is shown here.

We manned aft steering (emergency steering) whenever we were in tight quarters or in harbors.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. This was my state room. Every person on board lives in a one person room and shares the head (toilet & shower) with the room next door.

The state rooms are very big. You have plenty of space.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. You can see how we replenished vessels alongside with fuel.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. Here you see forklift training. Precise maneuvering of a forklift in very tight quarter on a rolling and pitching deck is no easy matter. It takes lots of practice. You had to prove yourself on shore and then pass a rigorous test at sea again.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. Again you see the process of underway replenishment.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left you see the officers mess.

On the right you see the petty officers mess.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the right you see the crew's mess

On the right you see the room of a homesteader. They literally moved in furniture and belongings to make the ship their new home.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the right you see another ship being replenished underway.

On the right you see the relative size of the equipment to a man. You have to enlarge the picture to see the men.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. Here you see more ships being replenished with fuel. Not all ships were US Navy.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left you see the deck equipment of the John Lenthal.

On the right you see the John Grumman alongside for practice maneuvers. The Gruman is a sister ship to the John Lenthal. The Captain of the Grumman has quite a sense of humor flying a pirate's flag.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. On the left you see the approach of an MSC Weapons Carrier.

On the right you see night operations.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Click on picture to see an enlargement. Here you see another ship being replenished with fuel. Not all ships were US Navy.

Click on picture to see an enlargement.

Consultant
Expert
Photography
Deliveries
Instruction
Stories
Videos
Reference

Captain Gregory C. Daley
PO Box 3826, Lafayette, LA 70502

email: info@CaptainGreg.net

(337) 456-5661
(337) 237-7777
(310) 463-6626

(Office)
(2nd Number)
(Cell Phone)